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Buses, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Ho Chi Minh City Airport Bus 109: 23/9 Park (Pham Ngu Lao) Bus Terminal to Tan Son Nhat International Airport by Bus

Ho Chi Minh City is served by an efficient network of city buses, mostly originating from the 23/9 Park (Pham Ngu Lao) Bus Terminal in District 1. Airport connectivity is also supported by city buses, with the dedicated Airport Bus Service 109 departing frequently from 23/9 Park Bus Terminal to Tan Son Nhat International Airport.

Note: 23/9 Park as I’ve learnt isn’t pronounced as Twenty-Three Nine Park, but rather, Twenty Third of September Park.

The amount of buses at 23/9 Park Bus Terminal may be a little bit overwhelming at first, but there’s actually just one main waiting area for buses at their office.

Just look out for the bus number while waiting.

The departure times of all bus services can be seen from the TV screen at the waiting area. Airport Bus Service 109 departs every 15 to 30 minutes from 5.30am to 1am daily.

Don’t cross the bus park to find the bus, all services will drive by the pick up point first.

Airport Bus Service 109 will be easy to spot, since it’s the only service from this terminal operating with yellow buses.


Getting on the bus is relatively easy as well with 3 doors open for boarding and the platform at around the same height as the bus’s first step.

The interior of the Airport Bus.

The interior is fitted with mostly single seats for more aisle space to place your luggage at.

Seats are even removed around the middle of the bus.

The route map of Airport Bus Service 109.

Departing from 23/9 Park Bus Terminal.

The Airport Bus Service 109 proceeds down the length of District 1, thereafter making a stop at Ben Thanh Bus Terminal.

Ben Thanh Bus Terminal is made up of many platforms in the middle of the road.

The platform height at Ben Thanh Bus Terminal also matches with the bus’s first step.

After Ben Thanh Bus Terminal with most passengers heading to the airport on board, the conductor comes around to sell tickets for the journey. Fares for the Airport Bus Service 109 cost VND 20,000 (~S$1.18) one way per person. This is a premium fare as the local Service 152 (normal green bus) costs just VND 5,000 (~S$0.30) on a similar route, though you need to walk a little bit towards Ben Thanh if you’re staying in Pham Ngu Lao to catch it by the road side. However, paying this premium fare gets you a lot more space for yourself and your luggage.

Free WiFi was touted on board, but I couldn’t find any to connect to.

Full window advertisements needs to be banned everywhere around the world.


Crossing the railway line at Phu Nhuan.

The bus went at a leisurely 40km/h throughout the journey. The route is touted as a 45 minute journey to the airport, but in the morning with no jams, the ride took just 30 minutes end-to-end.

Approaching Than Son Nhat International Airport.

Turning left into the international terminal building.

The Airport Bus Service 109 terminates at the Tan Son Nhat international terminal. To get to the domestic terminal, you need to walk ahead through the covered walkway.


The bus stops at the arrivals level on the ground floor.

If you’re heading from Tan Son Nhat International Airport to the city, just look out for the line of buses parked on the outer lane.

Follow the signs to ascend to the departures level. The entrance will be beside Burger King.


Head up with the escalators to the 2nd Floor for departures.

The escalators will lead up to the departure driveway. Show your boarding pass to the security personnel at the door to enter the check-in area.

Overall, the Airport Bus Service 109 is an affordable and fuss-free way to get from downtown Ho Chi Minh City to Than Son Nhat International Airport. With buses in Ho Chi Minh City having an unofficial priority over other vehicles on the road with everyone giving way when a bus is approaching, this might be one of the best ways to get to the airport.

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Bavet, Buses, Cambodia, Ho Chi Minh City, Moc Bai, Phnom Penh, Vietnam

Giant Ibis: Phnom Penh to Ho Chi Minh City by Bus

With air tickets from Phnom Penh back to Singapore costing around 4 times the price than that of those departing from Ho Chi Minh City, I opted to take the cheaper option, which also gives me a bonus Vietnam visit. This is turning into a strange yet logical ASEAN cross-border tour involving Singapore, Malaysia, Cambodia and Vietnam.

Giant Ibis is one of the more reliable bus operators in Cambodia. Having experienced what it’s like to skimp on a little bit of money for tickets the last time I did the reverse route (and the contrast when using Giant Ibis to Siem Reap), I decided just to top up a little bit more for the bus ticket and cross over to Vietnam without much worries or hassle.

You can book your Giant Ibis tickets online at 12Go AsiaBaolau or Easybook.

Before the trip, I received an email from 12Go Asia saying that Giant Ibis has changed their departure point. Instead of the riverfront, Giant Ibis now departs from Chivapol Street 90, behind the National Library. This location so happens to be nearer to the Phnom Penh Railway Station and my hotel, so it wasn’t a great issue for me.

Giant Ibis’s new terminal at Chivapol Street 90 has a fully sheltered area to board the bus in as compared with the basic roadside stop at the old terminal at Street 106 near the night market by the riverfront.

My bus to Ho Chi Minh City (Saigon) today, operated by a Hyundai Universe Xpress Noble.

A minibus was also at the terminal, but it was on the shorter domestic route to Kampot or Kep.

I walked in to the ticketing counter at the Giant Ibis Bus Terminal to exchange my ticket as stated on the 12Go Asia print-out, but they mentioned that they accept the print-out as it is, or you can even show it to the conductor on your phone.

Once I got that settled, I loaded my bag into the storage compartment. However, this time, there were no bag tags given out and all the luggage was just taken in like a normal bus company. Hmm.

The facilities available on board the Giant Ibis Hyundai Universe Xpress Noble.

Ho Chi Minh City, here I come (for your airport)!

The interior of the Giant Ibis bus.


The conductor comes around to check for tickets (ie. my 12Go Asia booking) and takes my passport away for some paperwork he has to do, possibly for the fast Vietnamese immigration clearance.

The view of the opposing seats.

A power socket is available for each pair of seats, mounted at the side below the window.

The legroom available on the Giant Ibis Hyundai Universe Xpress Noble.

The position of my power socket.

The view of the interior from my seat.

The TV seems to be out of service, with the WiFi details stuck on it instead,


Departing from the Giant Ibis Bus Terminal.

Shortly after departure, the conductor makes a welcome announcement, briefing about the bus journey to Ho Chi Minh City, and distributes a pastry from Blue Pumpkin.

My Blue Pumpkin Chocolate Croissant for breakfast.

A bottle of water was also provided.



Passing by the Independence Monument on the way out of Phnom Penh.


As the junction before the Preah Monivong New Bridge was for a right turn only, the bus had to make a u-turn a short distance ahead, which took up almost the entire both sides of the road. However, all the cars seem to be expecting it and everyone slowed down and stopped without a single horn sounded during the u-turn.



Crossing the Preah Monivong New Bridge over the Bassac River out of Phnom Penh city.

I definitely do not miss the jams when trying to get in to Phnom Penh.

The typical scenery just after crossing the Bassac River.


Approaching the Neak Loeung Bridge.

The Neak Loeung Bridge is a key landmark on National Highway 1 as it crosses the Mekong River, a journey which involved a ferry ride as the only means to get across before the bridge was built. The Neak Loeung Bridge effectively shaved the long waiting time for the ferry and sailing time to just a 5-minute drive over the river.




Unfortunately, this also means that the businesses in the town of Neak Loeung may not get as many passing-through visitors anymore since the highway bypasses it totally.



The bus made a brief stop at Tela Five Star Mart at Kampong Soeng in Ba Phnum District.


The washrooms were available behind the souvenir and snacks shop, which kind of reminded me a little bit of Yong Peng in Johor.


The price of the stuff in the shop were also a little bit higher than the usual Cambodian prices.

Also parked here was a Danh Danh Express Bus on the same route from Phnom Penh to Ho Chi Minh City, except that this had a 2+1 seating configuration. Hmm, maybe I should try this next time.



My Giabt Ibis bus at Tela Five Star Mart.

There was also a Sapaco Limousine minibus taking a break here. Maybe I might also consider this instead of the Sapaco Tourist bus.

After the break, the conductor comes around to return everyone their passports to clear Cambodian immigration individually.



Crossing the Tonle Wai Kou after Svay Rieng.

Entering Bavet, the border town.

Passing by the Sapaco Tourist restaurant near the border.


Hmm, I don’t recall seeing casinos around here before.



Lots of American-style trucks hauling containers are seen coming into Cambodia from Vietnam as well.


A lot more casinos are situated closer to the border.

Entering the Bavet International Checkpoint.


The bus stops just before the building for everyone to disembark for individual immigration clearance.

Just approach the nearest available counter at Bavet International Checkpoint, or follow the instructions by the bus conductor to move ahead to another counter.

Once done with immigration, continue walking straight ahead on the road to the far end.



The bus will drive ahead to the far end of the checkpoint.

Before boarding, the staff collects back everyone’s passport for Vietnamese immigration.



Departing from Bavet International Checkpoint.

Vietnam is just up ahead.


However, after dropping off the conductor holding everyone’s passports, the bus made a right turn to Prestige Duty Free for a lunch stop.



The Giant Ibis bus at Prestige Duty Free.




You could buy the wide array of duty free products available if you wish…

… but the main purpose for this 30-minute stop was for lunch.

Here’s the menu of the PSI Restaurant at Prestige Duty Free:


Click on the image to enlarge.


Click on the image to enlarge.


I ordered the Beef Lok Lak for lunch.

Hmm… Looks a little different than the one featured on the picture. Oh well, still edible anyway.

Once done with your meal, pay over at the cashier counter.

Once most passengers are done with lunch, the staff will call for boarding.

Goodbye Cambodia…

… and hello again, Vietnam.

Entering Moc Bai Border Checkpoint.


The new Moc Bai Border Checkpoint of Vietnam, a significant upgrade from the warehouse I’ve been through the last time.

Here, you have to take all your belongings with you for them to be scanned by Vietnamese customs.

Enter the air-conditioned building through the middle entrance.

Inside, washrooms are available just at the entrance before immigration.

Find your conductor who will already be at the immigration counter, and wait for your name or country to be called out. This happens when the immigration officer has stamped your passport and skillfully tossed it over to the bus conductor. You will then receive your stamped passport from the conductor. Proceed to have your bags scanned, and head back out to reboard the bus.

I like this express immigration service by Giant Ibis already.



The whole immigration process took probably just under 20 minutes.




For the other bus companies, seems like there was a lot more waiting to be done.


Exiting the Moc Bai Border Checkpoint, looking at the former temporary site which felt like a warehouse, which is in fact a legit warehouse today.


Heading onwards to Ho Chi Minh City.



Seems like a new highway is taking shape. Hopefully this would make for a faster journey to Ho Chi Minh City in future.


As the bus approached Ho Chi Minh City, it started to rain pretty heavily.



Passing by Tan Son Nhat International Airport.



Driving by the Nhieu Loc – Thi Nghe Canal.



Passing by the railway bridge over Nhieu Loc – Thi Nghe Canal.

Shortly before arrival, the conductor once again makes a pre-arrival announcement and thanks everyone for choosing Giant Ibis for the journey.

The bus stops at the Ho Chi Minh City Giant Ibis office at 237, Pham Ngu Lao Street, District 1.

Retrieving my bag from the luggage compartment.


Once everyone has collected their bags, the bus departed from the drop-off point.

From here, I continued on by foot to my hostel.

If you need a return ticket or any further assistance, you can contact the Giant Ibis staff here at their office.

Overall, Giant Ibis remains to be a comfortable way to travel based on their soft product of English-speaking staff, friendliness and the express immigration service at Vietnam, but with newer buses of other bus companies offering a 2+1 seating configuration or smaller limousine vans with a 1+1 seating configuration, the once-typical 2+2 seating configuration of Giant Ibis may not be sustainable in the long run. However, for now, I think I might stick with Giant Ibis for bus travel around Cambodia.

You can book your Giant Ibis tickets online at 12Go AsiaBaolau or Easybook.

Buses, Cambodia, Phnom Penh, Sihanoukville

KK STAR Airport Express: Premium Bus Network in Phnom Penh

KK STAR Airport Express is a premium bus network with services focusing mainly on bus transport to Phnom Penh International Airport. The KK STAR Airport Express plies the following routes:

Airport Express Red Line
Phnom Penh International Airport – Dara Airport Hotel – President Hotel – Sunway Hotel – Raffles Hotel le Royal – Sisowath High School – Toyoko Inn (and return by the opposing direction)

Airport Express Orange Line
Phnom Penh International Airport – InterContinental Hotel – Sihanouk West Street – Sihanouk East Street – Naga 2 – Naga 1 – Toyoko Inn – Sofitel (and return by the opposing direction)

Airport Train Shuttle Line
Phnom Penh Railway Station – Wat Phnom – Central Market – Sisowath High School – Independence Monument – Naga 2 – Royal Palace – Night Market – Mekong Express Bus Station – Phnom Penh Railway Station (one way loop service)

Sihanoukville Intercity Line
Phnom Penh International Airport – Rest Area – Sihanoukville Airport – Sihanoukville Mekong Express Bus Station – Onederz Hostel – Sokha Hotel – Independence Hotel  (and return by the opposing direction)

For the Airport Express Red LineAirport Express Orange Line and Sihanoukville Intercity Line, KK STAR has a counter at the Phnom Penh International Airport transportation desk located in the arrival hall.

You can purchase the bus ticket at this counter. One way tickets to Phnom Penh city costs USD5 while one way tickets to Sihanoukville costs USD15.

The bus will wait at the driveway near the counter once ready.

For the Airport Train Shuttle Line, KK STAR has a counter beside the Royal Railway ticket counters. However, the counter wasn’t staffed during my visit.


Nevertheless, I suppose you could buy a ticket from the driver if the bus has arrived.

The KK STAR Airport Express is a good complement to the Royal Railway Airport Shuttle Train, providing an alternative to the airport should you have missed the train or to continue to other destinations around Phnom Penh city from Phnom Penh Railway Station.

However, with ticket prices on the high side, it may be better to stick with the Phnom Penh City Bus network or even just Grab around with the free rides worth KHR 12,000 for trips beginning or ending at Phnom Penh Railway Station with the promo code of GRABTRAIN.

Buses, Johor Bahru, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Transnasional: Johor Bahru (Larkin Sentral) to Kuala Lumpur (TBS) by Night Bus

To begin my Cambodia trip, as I was comparing prices for flights to Phnom Penh, I figured that it would have been much cheaper to fly out from KLIA rather than Changi Airport, with a slightly earlier arrival time into Phnom Penh as well. So to complete this budget experience, I decided to get the overnight Transnasional 1am bus from JB’s Larkin Sentral to KL again – a trial run for my potential future situation should the new airport taxes from Changi Airport get too expensive for short-haul trips.

From Singapore, I got on SBS Transit Service 170 to get to Larkin Sentral.

Hmm, is this a preview to another upcoming trip?

Heading to the departure lounge for express buses.

My boarding pass for the Transnational 1am bus to KL.


Scan your boarding pass at the gate to enter the departure lounge.

Guess my bus and plenty others are delayed today.

Transnational departs from Platform C of Larkin Sentral.


The bus came at around 1.30am, so that’s about a half hour delay in arrival.


The interior of the Transnational Business Club bus. Some passengers have already boarded from Pasir Gudang.

The view from my seat. Unfortunately, the USB charging ports were not available on this bus.

The bus departed around 1.45am, around 45 minutes behind schedule.

.

.

.

It was a peaceful sleep on board, despite the tight legroom since this bus has 10 rows of seats rather than the usual 9.

However, the bus arrived in TBS at around 5.30am, which makes it a pretty quick 4-hour journey, just in time for the first LRT train to the city for breakfast.

And because some of the TBS escalators were out of order as usual, I had to walk across the platforms to get to a working one in order to exit the terminal.

Overall, Transnasional was once again a comfortable way to get from JB to KL overnight, but this trip calls for a lot more travel experiences than this. Stay tuned!

BRT, Buses, Indonesia, Palembang

Trans Musi Corridor 5: Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar to Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport by Bus

The Trans Musi is the main public bus system in Palembang, with most routes radiating from the main Ampera Bridge area. Trans Musi Corridor 5 plies between Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar (AAL/Albar) and Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport.

From Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar, you can transfer to Corridor 1 to get to the main Ampera area.

While touted as a bus rapid transit system (BRT), the Trans Musi does not operate with segregated bus lanes like on the TransJakarta. However, the Trans Musi does have its own ticketing system which allows a maximum of two transfers on each ticket, unlike on the Trans Batam network which requires a new ticket to be purchased when transferring to another corridor.


Board the Trans Musi Corridor 5 bus to Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport from the right side of the main Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar building. The Trans Musi Corridor 5 bus may not board passengers right at the boarding halt, but rather just by the road. You may enter the bus via the front door with steps.


The interior of the Trans Musi Hino RK8-235 bus, which runs on most busway routes across Indonesia.


The Trans Musi Hino RK8-235 bus features tip-up seats for the pair of seats by the sides of the main doors to allow for a flushed standing aisle space and more standing space during peak periods.

Travelling at a leisurely 40km/h along Jalan Bypass Alang-Alang Lebar with brief stops at halts with no passengers waiting to board or alight. Guess the bus frequency is annoyingly regulated here too.

Turning left onto Jalan Soekarno Hatta towards the airport.

Picking up more passengers to the airport at PTC Halt along Jalan Soekarno Hatta, the shorter but less comfortable interchange for passengers transferring over from Corridor 1 to Corridor 5.

Heading straight on to the airport.

Passing under Asrama Haji (PDK) LRT Station on the future Palembang LRT.

Making the final left turn towards Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport on Jalan Gubernur Haji Asnawi Mangku Alam.


Entry to Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport requires a fee to be paid, which includes the parking space.

Approaching Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport with the Bandara SMB II LRT Station in the background.

Approaching the Bandara SMB II Halt.

Arrived at Bandara SMB II Halt.

Similar to other halts, the bus’ main doors will align with the boarding and alighting steps.

The Bandara SMB II Halt is located on a separate shelter at the car park.

From the terminal, cross the driveway to the further shelter, along the area which says “Shuttle Bus“.

Similarly, from the Bandara SMB II Halt, cross the driveway to get the the terminal building.

BRT, Buses, Indonesia, Palembang

Trans Musi Corridor 1: Ampera Bridge/Monpera to Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar by Bus

The Trans Musi is the main public bus system in Palembang, with most routes radiating from the main Ampera Bridge area. Trans Musi Corridor 1 spans the main artery of Palembang, plying the heavily-utilized looping route between Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar (AAL/Albar) and Ampera along Jalan Raya Lintas Timur on the Trans-Sumatran Highway.

While touted as a bus rapid transit system (BRT), the Trans Musi does not operate with segregated bus lanes like on the TransJakarta. However, the Trans Musi does have its own ticketing system which allows a maximum of two transfers on each ticket, unlike on the Trans Batam network which requires a new ticket to be purchased when transferring to another corridor.

The main attraction has to be the Ampera Bridge, a vertical-lift bridge which one would think of when visualizing a landmark of Palembang.

This area will be served by the upcoming Ampera LRT Station on the Palembang LRT.

This area is also home to the Masjid Agung Palembang.

An upcoming monument, possibly related to the 18th Asian Games, just outside the Masjid Agung Palembang, with the flags of ASEAN members gracing the monument.

While many online guides and route planners (including Google Street View) show that the Ampera halt is located right under the bridge, it is actually now located nearer to the Masjid Agung Palembang, right outside Monumen Ampera (Monpera), and is named, well, Monpera.

As this is a key integrated halt on the Trans Musi network, a couple of staff are on hand to assist with any of your route or transfer queries, and will also sell you a ticket in advance to speed things up for the conductor on board the bus.

Flat fares of Rp.5,000 (S$0.48) apply for the Trans Musi irregardless of distance or age group. Each ticket allows for two transfers ie. you may travel up to 3 corridors with 1 ticket.


The typical Hino RK8-235 buses which run on most busway routes across Indonesia.

Some of these buses are decked out in Jakarta Palembang 2018 advertisements, along with the rest of Indonesia and ASEAN.

While many online guides also say that there are parallel routes between Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar and Ampera, and heading onwards to other destinations, the Trans Musi actually works with high-frequency (1 to 5 min) Corridor 1 buses and lots of feeder corridors radiating out of Ampera.

Just ask the staff at hand if in doubt. They’re all really friendly and are genuine in trying to help you.

If you’re travelling for long distances, try getting the last row of seats as these are the only seats facing in the direction of travel.

If you have not gotten a ticket from the staff at Monpera Halt or from the previous connecting Trans Musi ride, you can purchase one from the on-board conductor.

(You’ll need to wave your ticket at the conductor once he calls for it when the bus departs Monpera, and he will go to those who do not have a ticket.)

The crappy view from my seat thanks to the Jakarta Palembang 2018 advertisements.

Trans Musi Corridor 1 follows Jalan Raya Lintas Timur (on the Trans-Sumatran Highway) in Palembang city, almost parallel to the upcoming Palembang LRT line. In future, the Trans Musi Corridor 1 would function more as a parallel feeder to the main Palembang LRT spine, serving the BRT halts in between the LRT stations.

While the Palembang LRT line turns right towards the Sultan Mahmud Badaruddin II International Airport, the Trans Musi Corridor 1 turns left towards Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar.

The Trans Musi Corridor 1 used to continue straight along Jalan Raya Lintas Timur as it offered a faster and more direct journey, however, the following portion of road at this junction is currently closed to facilitate the construction of this new flyover. The Trans Musi Corridor 1 would probably revert to its original route once this flyover is completed.

Turning right onto Jalan Bypass Alang-Alang Lebar to get to Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar.

Approaching Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar.

The alighting halt is located to the left of the main Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar building. If you’re interested in having your bones shaken on long bus rides, long-distance bus services are available here where you can continue to head north to Pekanbaru, Medan or Banda Aceh, or even southeast towards Bandar Lampung, across onto Java to Jakarta or Surabaya, or even continuing onto Bali and ending up in Denpasar.


If you are heading in the reverse direction, board the Trans Musi Corridor 1 bus from the right side of the main Terminal Alang-Alang Lebar building.

Buses, Singapore

Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal: New Bus Terminal Located On Former KTM Land

Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal is located on the former KTM land (Kampong Bahru Yard) and Royal Malaysian Customs godown. The terminal opened on 10 March 2018, replacing the former New Bridge Road Bus Terminal located outside of Outram Park MRT Station, which is now closed to make way for the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Elective Care Centre.

For a viewpoint on the Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal relating to the former KTM land, click here.

The Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal features a standard concourse area reminiscent of newer bus terminals or interchanges such as Woodlands Temporary Bus Interchange and Tampines Concourse Bus Interchange.


The Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal is located along a new stretch of Spooner Road, extending on from the angled right turn to the former Malayan Railways Running Bungalow and Quarters.

The former Running Bungalow and quarters are visible from the Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal.


The former lush green railway yard is now populated by Lush Green-liveried buses.


Service information boards are available around the terminal.


Food and drinks are available at the food stalls operated by NTWU Canteen. While it caters mainly for drivers on their layover, the NTWU Canteen is open to the public as well.


Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal consists mainly of sawtooth berths for boarding, with buses pulling up only upon departure.

The bus services available at Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal, with operators from SBSTransit, SMRT and Go-Ahead Singapore.

Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal (and the future URA carpark) is linked to the nearby Blair Road by a new universally-accessible covered linkway, which connects to the existing sheltered walkway to Spottiswoode Park Estate.

The future direct link to the new URA carpark via a set of staircase is not sheltered.


The entrance to the future URA carpark, with the view of the newly extended Spooner Road.

The overview of Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal as seen from Kampong Bahru Road.



Buses serving Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal have their destinations updated on their electronic destination signages (EDS).

The former entrance to the Royal Malaysian Customs on the Kampong Bahru Road slipway towards Bukit Purmei at the junction of Kampong Bahru Road and Jalan Bukit Merah is now a pedestrian entrance to the Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal.


A new MAN A95 double-decker bus serving the new limited stop Service 12e departing from the new Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal.

Being the closest terminal to Chinatown, the Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal also houses the two premium Chinatown Direct services, linking the residential areas of Ang Mo Kio (CT8) and Bedok (CT18) directly to Chinatown via expressways.


The Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal serves mainly as a terminating point for buses plying the Chinatown area. While it doesn’t serve an MRT station directly like the previous New Bridge Road Bus Terminal, most passengers would simply alight at the bus stop outside the former interchange to get to Outram Park MRT Station or SGH and not continue on to this new terminal, which wouldn’t affect much about connectivity. After all, all buses heading to Chinatown from here will also serve Outram Park MRT Station and SGH. The new terminal will certainly improve the connectivity to Spottiswoode Park Estate, and bus captains will now have a more spacious area to rest and have their meals at when laying over at Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal.

For a viewpoint on the Kampong Bahru Bus Terminal relating to the former KTM land, click here.

Buses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

AeroBus/SkyBus (AeroSky Ventures – Wawasan Sutera/Era Mesra): AirAsia Pre-Book from KL Sentral to klia2 for RM8.90

AeroSky Ventures operate frequent bus services between KL Sentral and klia2. While buses theoretically depart every 30 minutes on individual AeroBus and SkyBus schedules, since they’re under one entity as previously mentioned, in actual operations, buses depart whenever full or almost full, which is actually every 10 minutes or so.

I pre-booked my ticket for only RM8.90 through AirAsia’s website when purchasing my flight ticket, which is actually a RM3.10 discount when compared to the on-site price of RM12. You can also do this under Manage My Booking if you have an upcoming flight. Do note that the ticket can be used on the day of your departure or arrival only.

Present your printed flight itinerary or boarding pass (if checked in online already) to the SkyBus counter at KL Sentral.

The counter staff will tick off the ASM1 SSR (Special Service Request) on the boarding pass or itinerary.

My bus ticket for the trip to klia2, with the fare still stated as RM12.

As previously mentioned, AeroBus and SkyBus operate under AeroSky Ventures for the KL Sentral – klia2 route, which is actually under Wawasan Sutera/Era Mesra. This time, the bus used was a generic Wawasan Sutera bus with a small AeroBus sticker pasted on the front. The interior of the bus, however, was similar to a normal AeroBus.

Bye Kuala Lumpur Railway Station.

Bye Najib.

Passing under the ERL and KTM tracks along Sungai Besi.


Would love to try the AirAsia Premium Red Lounge one day, but I couldn’t find it anywhere under Manage My Booking.

Passing by Mitsui Outlet Park.

Approaching klia2.




The empty interior of the Wawasan Sutera bus after all passengers have alighted.

The journey from KL Sentral to klia2 took slightly less than an hour. However, you should factor in a 90-minute travel time in case of traffic jams or if you’re the first person on board the bus, waiting for it to fill up.

After entering the gateway@klia2 building, take the travelators up to Level 2.

To get to the klia2 terminal building itself, walk through the length of the entire gateway@klia2 mall, and head up to Level 3. From here, I continued on to get on my flight back to Singapore.

Buses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Rail Replacement Service, Trains

KTM Komuter Rail Replacement Service KTM2: Sentul KTM Komuter Station to Sentul LRT Station by Free Shuttle Bus

Shuttle KTM2, also known as the KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus Service, is a Rail Replacement Service on the KTM Komuter Klang Valley Sector connecting Sentul KTM Komuter station and Sentul LRT Station with no intermediate stops since 3 February 2018 as there are no train services running between Putra and Sentul stations.

This cross-line shuttle bus route is in place due to the portion of the line between Simpang Batu and Sentul Railway Station being closed for the Klang Valley Double Track (KVDT) track maintenance and renewal work, offering an alternative to access the city area and Bandar Tasik Selatan via the Sri Petaling LRT Line.

From the platform, follow the signs to the bus waiting area.


KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Buses to Sentul LRT Station will wait in front of KTM1 buses to KL Sentral. From the ramp down to the bus boarding area, turn left.

Board the KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus by any open door.

Departing from Sentul Railway Station.

Turning left onto Jalan Sentul.

Heading onto Jalan Tanah Lapang. While it is geographically closer to Sentul Timur LRT Station from here, there is no direct road access, hence probably the decision to have the KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus to serve Sentul LRT Station instead.

Turning left to Sentul LRT Station.

The KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus drops off and picks up passengers on the station side of Jalan 2/48a.



From here, you can take the Sri Petaling Line to PWTC for Putra station, Bandaraya for Bank Negara station or Bandar Tasik Selatan for Bandar Tasik Selatan station as an alternative to the KTM Komuter Batu Caves – Pulau Sebang (Tampin) Line.

You can also use the Sri Petaling Line to access the KL city area from BandarayaMasjid Jamek, Plaza Rakyat or Hang Tuah stations.


For the reverse direction towards Sentul KTM Komuter Station, wait at the foot of the escalators for the KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus. The KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus will depart according to its schedule.

Click here to access the timetable of the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus.

You can also take the KTM1  KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus Service from Sentul KTM Komuter Station as an alternative to get to KL Sentral.

For more information on the Rail Replacement Bus Service, visit RailTravel Station’s dedicated page on the KTM Komuter Klang Valley Sector.

Buses, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Rail Replacement Service, Trains

KTM Komuter Rail Replacement Service KTM1: KL Sentral to Sentul KTM Komuter Station by Free Shuttle Bus

Shuttle KTM1, also known as the KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus Service, is a Rail Replacement Service on the KTM Komuter Klang Valley Sector connecting KL Sentral and Sentul KTM Komuter stations with no intermediate stops since 3 February 2018 as there are no train services running between Putra and Sentul stations.

This parallel-line shuttle bus route is in place due to the portion of the line between Simpang Batu and Sentul Railway Station being closed for the Klang Valley Double Track (KVDT) track maintenance and renewal work.

To access the shuttle bus, follow the signs placed on the KTM Komuter concourse or on the pillars leading up to the bus boarding platform at KL Sentral.

The KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus departs from the same level as the buses heading for KLIA, klia2 and Awana Genting.


Instead of heading straight on to the coaches for KLIA, klia2 or Awana Genting, make a u-turn to the former boarding spot of RapidKL bus U82.


Continue straight on to the end of the platform.

The waiting RapidKL buses are for the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus.


Get on the first bus with the door opened. The bus may not show the route information on the electronic destination signage (EDS) if its still early before departure.

The interior of the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus.

The KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus will depart according to its schedule.

Click here to access the timetable of the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus.

Heading out of KL Sentral via Jalan Tun Sambanthan.


The KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus heads from KL Sentral to Sentul via Jalan Damansara and Lebuhraya Sultan Iskandar.

Heading down Jalan Sultan Azlan Shah to access Sentul Railway Station.

Turning right to Sentul Railway Station.

Bypassing the row of KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Buses on standby at Sentul.

The journey time from KL Sentral to Sentul on a weekend took just 13 minutes – 5 minutes faster than the running time of 18 minutes based on the former through-service KTM Komuter Klang Valley Sector timetable. Maybe KTM should just cease operations of their train services and convert to a bus company instead.

Head up the stairs to access the concourse area.

Touch in at the faregates with your KomuterLink card or at the side gate for Touch ‘n Go users. For cash payment, buy your token at the vending machines first.

Through tickets between KL Sentral and Sentul are not accepted if you are travelling on this route. Purchase a ticket from your origin to KL Sentral, and buy a new ticket at Sentul to continue on to Batu Caves. If you buy a ticket from your origin station to Batu Caves directly, the portion between KL Sentral and Batu Caves will be forfeited once you exit the system to transfer onto the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus, and you will have to buy a new ticket at Sentul to continue onwards to Batu Caves.

Get on the KTM Komuter train at Platform 1 for Batu Caves.

For the return journey, follow the signs back to the bus waiting area.

A fleet of KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Buses are ready to depart from Sentul back to KL Sentral. The KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus will depart according to its schedule.

Click here to access the timetable of the KTM1 KL Sentral – Sentul Free Shuttle Bus.

You can also take the KTM2 KTM Sentul – LRT Sentul Free Shuttle Bus Service from Sentul KTM Komuter Station as an alternative to get to the city area and Bandar Tasik Selatan.

For more information on the Rail Replacement Bus Service, visit RailTravel Station’s dedicated page on the KTM Komuter Klang Valley Sector.